Registering your tokens if you live in the United States

#6

You should be good then. Make sure to own both the Ethereum private key and the EOS private key. That way you are the owner of these addresses. No government can prevent anyone from dropping tokens on your EOS-address I guess :grinning:.

So be the owner of the keys, back them up really well and check here to see if your EOS-address is registered on your Ethereum-address.

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#7

Thank you for replying Rene! :tipping_hand_woman:t5: I appreciate it​:ok_woman:t4:

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#8

Hey guys, I am not from US and I am a newbie in the world of crypto. So forgive me if my question sounds stupid, but how the authorities are gonna figure out if you have crypto or not? Isn’t it kind of confidential info?

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#9

I’m sure that all the info should be kept anonymous and authorities have no rights to share it with government or public,

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#10

I’m from Europe and I don’t declare my crypto.
How do they know you own crypto? Can your bank rat on you?

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#11

Yes, I agree! I mean, if huge sums of money are involved, I can understand that exchanges wanna check with the government. But in case of regular customers, that’s their private business!

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#12

I believe that now with regulations being adopted exchanges and crypto supporting banks want to secure themselves reporting on everyone holding crypto. I can’t think of other explanation

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#13

Ok, got your idea at last. Yes, that’s another point. Agree with you.

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#14

Of course, banks are very anxious about the privacy and anonymity that crypto provides to the users.

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#15

Centralization provides you with security and all the stuff but sometimes they exceed their powers. For instance, I’ve recently heard of a couple of cases when my friend’s payment was stopped because it seemed suspicious for a bank. Come on, people!

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#16

Have you tried to use vpn? :smile:

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#17

Why not to stop payment, if it looks like suspicious, what if this payment is for the bad things

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#18

The banks have got withdrawal limits for those purposes. I hate when they call me to just confirm an ordinary transaction that seemed to be suspicious :rage:

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#19

I guess banks have some rules and restrictions that don’t fit every transaction. That’s why sometimes just a simple transaction occurs to be suspicious.

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#20

Have you had such situations as well?

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#21

Better late than never :smiley:
When you access your personal account and make a tranfer, whether you use VPN or not, they’ll figure out it’s you 'cause you open your account in the first place. Or am I missing something?

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#22

Well, it might be true, but in this case it was a simple money transfer, nothing suspicious, but the government is trying to limit non-contractual jobs by verifying each payment, and it looks especially shady to them, if the same amount of money is transfered to the same account on a constant basis, it’s a salary then, and somebody might be hiding from taxes you know :smiley:

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#23

Sometimes a simple money transfer can change the world :rofl: But in general you are right, banks and governments try to limit non-contractual jobs

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#24

If it is not security tokens, there is no need to register

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#25

Exactly. So, payments in crypto will solve this problem for ordinary people. On the other hand, anonymous transactions are a gateway for money laundering, so basic regulation is definitely needed

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